Fountain de Fotos

Empanada Nation

As the crazy foodie that I am, here is a photographic chronicle of [just about] every empanada that I have eaten this past semester in South America. In every country, town, and village that I visited I managed to find one. I found them in restaurants, homemade in homes, and fried on the street corner. I even tried making them myself.

I just want to convey that empanadas are a pretty big deal, and as such I wish to share my empanada joy with you. (I have also linked each picture with the coordinating blog post of my non-culinary experiences and bucket list goals, so that you can experience the full realm of South American adventures).

¡Bon Appetit!

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Skyping a friend in my kitchen of my host family. Enjoying an empanada from the local bakery, Lo Saldes, from across the street. Every bakery has fresh empanadas for sale.

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One of the best empanadas I have eaten. Pomaire, Chile.

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Did not eat this one, probably because it is a MONSTER. Found this in Pomaire, Chile, land of the 1 kilo (that’s 2.2lb) empanada.

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Homemade empanadas that the host mom made one Sunday. Empanadas are traditionally eaten on Sundays. Back in the day, you couldn’t find empanadas on any other day. Today they are quite the staple that you can find every where, all the time.

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Argentinian empanada! This one was filled with the traditional Mendozan filling--called Humita–which includes corn and cheese. I bought this at a vegetarian restaurant. It is made with integral (“whole wheat’) dough.

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Empanadas that we ate in Mendoza, Argentina on our bike-wine tour. These pictured were at the Mendiva Bodega (winery). Empanadas go quite well paired with wine!

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Spinach filled empanada enjoyed a top a famous hill in the Mendoza, Argentina city park. The statue pictured in the background is on some of the Argentinian peso bills. Argentinians are much more daring in their empanada fillings. They experiment with all sorts of vegetables and fillings. !Muy rico!

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Very interestingly shaped empanada in Mendoza, Argentina. Empanadas are frequently used as appetizers or starters in South American meals. {Note how it is paired with some nice Argentinian wine]

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Homemade empanadas that I made myself with some friends! Such a fun experience! They came out so well! For a Sunday lunch, we fried them and filled them with queso and camarones (“shrimp and cheese”), neoplitanas (tomato, cheese, and oregano), and even some manzana (“apple”) ones–which are not traditional Chilean at all, but were equally delicious!

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Street queso empanada, 5:30am, Valpariso, Chile.

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Warning! Not a real empanada. It is a special Indian dish that I enjoyed during the second week of November to celebrate the Indian holiday of Diwali. Delicious with curry flavors and eaten with a spicy sauce.

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Brazilian fried cheese empanada, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

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Spinach and cheese filled empanada, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Purchased at a local juice bar, note the fresh fruit in the background. In Brazil, its awesome because when you ask for pimiento (“pepper”) they give you a whole tray full of like 6 bottles of hot sauce with varying degrees of spiciness. The best for this Texan girl.

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The empanada stand outside San Joaquin campus by the metro! You can get a sopapilla for 130 pesos (about 25 cents) and an empanada for 100 pesos. They have toppings such as palta (“avacado”), pebre (a chopped tomato, onion sauce) and ahi (spicy chilean pepper sauce) to top your cheap fried treats. Delicous and cheap, perfect for the college student on a budget.

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Nice hot warm spinach and cheese empanada, Montevideo, Uruguay.

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Mini-appetizer empanada, tango show, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Lousy, lousy empanada. Queso y acetunas (“cheese and olives”); Montevideo bus station, Uruguay. About 6:30am, way earlier than traditional empanada-eating time. But when you have been traveling for 8 hours and still have about 8 to go before you get home, you don’t care what time it is, you just want your darn empanada.

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Fried cheese empanada, Cusco, Peru airport. Using up the last of my Peruvian soles.

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Mini-appetizer, cheese empanada at a host-family cocktail party in early September. Back when I was still innocent and learning Spanish

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Possibly the best empanada that I ever ate in Chile. I bought it in San Pedro de Atacama, Chile. It is Napolitana empanada filled with cheese, tomato, oregano. It was huge and only cost me 1.500 pesos. So good. I ate about three of these from this same shop.

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Free empanada that we found in the main plaza of San Pedro, Chile. Natrually accompanied by wine, a cueca show and good company. Nothing says “Happy Chilean Independence” like a traditional Pino empanada!

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WORST EMPANADA EVER. IT WAS LIKE A THIN FRIED PIECE OF DOUGH WITH A DROP OF GRODY CHEESE. SUCH A DISAPPOINTMENT! Generally I like Chilean empanadas..

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Just enjoying an empanada on the 18th of September, Chilean Independence Day, in San Pedro de Atacama.

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Delicious homemade empanadas, made by my Linares host mom for a folkloric show. The first empanada I ate in Chile, and definitely one of the best.

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Cheese empanada, Isla Negra, home of author Pablo Neruda, Chile

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Cheese empanada, La Vega, Santiago, Chile

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Street empanada, outside San Joaquin campus

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Empanada, Quizco beach in the winter (August), Chile

This entry was published on December 22, 2012 at 7:52 pm. It’s filed under Chile, food and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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